Am I Too Old To Learn To Ride A Horse?

We all have a list of things we want to do before it’s too late but if one of these things is to learn to ride a horse how old is too old? You might be surprised, and pleased, to know that you’re never too old to learn to ride, regardless of whether you’re 30, 40, 50 or even over 80! As long as you’re able to get on the horse you can ride. I once had a lady who decided she wanted to learn to ride and didn’t let anything get in her way, not the fact that she was 75 and certainly not the fact that she was registered blind! She was a true inspiration and if somebody like that can do it then anybody can regardless of their age, or even disability.

Is it difficult to learn to ride a horse?

The simple answer is no it’s not difficult but the longer answer, while coming to the same conclusion is more complicated. It’s easy for a horse rider to say to you that riding is easy and it’s always something I’ve very caution to avoid saying. What’s easy for one person takes a lot more practise for another person. Once you’ve mastered the basics then I’m sure you’ll agree it’s not difficult. When you first start it can seem like there’s so much to learn and that you’ll never get the hang of it but believe me if you really want to learn to ride then you will. You just need to practise and keep at it. I know you’ll probably laugh at this but, when I was young and started to learn to ride I couldn’t practise on a horse when I didn’t have a lesson so used my pedal bike to practise instead! I know that you’re not going to get any feedback from a bike but I would practise as much as I could, whether it was my leg position or my posture it all helped. Yes my friends laughed but I wanted to learn so much that I just carried on.

How long does it take to learn to ride a horse?

As with most things in life you need to practise and the more you practise the quickly you’ll be able to ride out on your own safely. While there’s no such thing as an average person we’ll imagine there is for this example. If you have one hour long group lesson a week every week then within two years you’ll be at a standard appropriate to riding out on your without anybody else. That’s not to say you’re doing it wrong if after two years you’ve not reached that level or that you’re a born natural if you’ve reached that level after 6 months. As I say it’s a guide for our fictitious average person. Your instructor will help by giving you regular feedback as to how you’re improving and if there’s any areas you need to pay more attention to.

Is it expensive to learn to ride a horse?

The cost of learning to ride will vary on whether you have lessons with a group of other people or private one-to-one lessons. Whether you’re specialising in a particular type of riding (such as dressage) or just general riding will also play a part. Sadly there’s no universal price for riding lessons, nor is there a standard length of lesson either. That said for a one hour group lesson you’ll likely pay something between $30 and $70 ($40 – $90 in Canada, £25 – £60 in the UK and $45 – $100 in Australia) and for a private lesson between $70 and $150 ($90 – $200 (Canada), £60 – £120 (UK) and $100 – $220 (Australia)) . Some schools will reduce the cost slightly if you book a block of lessons in advance.

Are group or private riding lessons better?

Group lessons are usually much cheaper than private lessons but the advantage of private lessons is that you you have your instructor’s full attention and each lesson is tailored to you and your level. Most people will have group lessons though, in part because they are cheaper than private lessons. Learning to ride a horse isn’t like learning to drive a car and some people prefer to learn at the same time as others. If you want to learn with some friends then group lessons are perfect for this.

If you want to specialise in a particular type of riding, such as dressage or eventing, then you’ll probably find that private lessons with an instructor who’s got experience in the field will help more. 

Does learning to ride a horse hurt?

No horse riding doesn’t hurt at all but when you first start learning to ride, or if you’ve had a long break, you’ll use muscle groups that you don’t normally use. After your first few lesson you may find that your legs ache a lot but this is normal and will go off after a couple days, having a warm bath after your lesson will help to stop the muscles aching so much. 

After a few lessons your muscles will have become conditioned to horse riding so will no longer ache. You’ll probably realise after one lesson that your legs don’t ache and haven’t done for a while – congratulations you’re well on the path to becoming a fully fledged rider now!

Do I need any special equipment before I start to learn to ride a horse?

If you’re not sure whether horse riding is for you and you just want to give it a go first then you’re not going to want to invest in a brand new outfit. That said though a riding hat or jockey skull is a must for beginners in my book. In some countries it’s a legal requirement but if you are unlucky enough to fall off it’ll help protect your head from injury. Some riding schools will have a collection of hats you could borrow but if you want to have your own then your local tack shop will be able to advise you on the right size for your head.

Footwear wise you want to be wearing sensible boots (or shoes if you don’t have boots) with a slight heal to them. Stilettos and sneakers as well as being a very bad idea are actually dangerous. The reason your footwear should have a small is heel is so that your foot won’t slip through the stirrup. When riding you should have the ball of your foot in the stirrup and your heel pointing downwards, this position will prevent your foot slipping right through but for new riders this isn’t a natural way of sitting.

In terms of the type of clothing you should wear it depends on whether you’re learning to ride English or Western style. If you’re riding English then you’ll want to wear pants or trousers that are snug fitting but not too tight. If they’re too loose then you’ll find that your legs will bit pinched by the stirrup leathers. If, however, you’re riding Western then those saddles have fenders instead of stirrup leathers so won’t pinch your legs. When it comes to your top you just want something that is comfortable, but try to not wear something that will ‘flap’ too much as you don’t want to frighten the horse.

Do I need to have my own horse before I learn to ride?

Absolutely not! You don’t need to have your own horse if you want to learn to ride, riding schools will provide a horse for you to learn on. If you do want to have your own horse though then you definitely can and some schools will even charge a lower fee for lessons if you bring your own horse. If you’re thinking about buying a horse to learn on then you might find this article on buying your first horse helpful.

Conclusion

There you have it, you’re never too old to learn to ride so what are you waiting for! Horse riding is a wonderful thing where you get to make great friends and experiences, it’ll introduce to the wonderful world of horses and you’ll wonder why you waited to get started. I hope that you thoroughly enjoy it!

I hope you found this article helpful, if you did I’d be grateful if you could share it please as it would really help me.